Workshop Series “JAPANESE HANDWORK”

Workshop series
Workshop series “JAPANESE HANDWORK

Japan Cultural Exchange (JCE) is organizing a workshop series focusing on Japanese art and crafts. In Japan, craftsmanship is alive and well and many original techniques have been maintained. Japanese people know the joy of working and creating something beautiful by hand. JCE would like to introduce these traditional Japanese techniques and offer you the experience of becoming familiar with Japanese Handwork. There will be two workshops coming up in June and July, with more workshops being on offer later in 2015.

Applying workshop!

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Sumie workshop “Bijin-ga” (picture of beautiful women)

Unfortunately, the Sumie workshop ‘Bijin-ga’ from March 12 has to be cancelled.

Sumie workshop

Workshops of “Bijin-ga” (picture of beautiful women) in March

The subject of March workshops is the Bijin-ga. Bijin-ga is a generic term for pictures of beautiful women in Japanese art, especially in woodblock printing of the Ukiyo-e genre, which predate photography. Ukiyo-e is a genre of woodblock prints and paintings that was produced in Japan from the 17th century to the 19th century.

I stress the point of practicing drawing with ‘a thin line finely’ through drawing Bijin-ga in the February and March workshops. In some previous workshops, we have practiced drawing a line by alternating heavy and light strokes mainly for a short line. By the way, regarding the line, it is important when drawing people’s faces and hair to draw a thin line with the same thickness without shaking as well as drawing a line with the heavy and light strokes. You will practice by copying Bijin-ga by Utamaro Kitagawa, a famous Japanese painter.  Utamaro was a success in the Edo period and was good at sensitive and elegant Bijin-ga.

“Bijin-ga” workshop will be completed within 4 hours. Both beginners and experienced people will be able to participate.

Sumie

Paintings in black ink are called sumie in Japan. Sumie basically uses only black ink but sometimes uses a little bit of other pigments as well. Sumie with other pigments is called Bokusaiga. Sumie uses various techniques of shading and gradation. Shading and gradation can be obtained through changing the amount of water added to the ink. Ink painting, which was developed as landscape paintings that is called Sansuiga in China in the last half of the Tang dynasty, became well-known as well as Zen in the Kamakura period (from 1185 to 1333), and then enjoyed great popularity in the Muromachi period (from 1333 to 1568). The subjects of Sumie include people, flowers, and birds as well.

Beauty of blank space

Sumie is that space is as important or perhaps more important than the objects. It is so-called “the beauty of blank space”. In Sumie, the white space or “emptiness” completes the painting.  On the other hand, to a westerner, empty space is often referred to as “negative” space. The pieces seem unfinished. This is one of the most different features between Sumie and the western methods.  Sumie is an art deeply rooted in Zen, it is one of the embodiments of Zen of finding beauty in blank space.

Workshop Leader

Teacher: Yuka
-Education : Tsukuba University in grad school (Master course) in Japan
-Licence : registered teacher in International Sumi-E Association in Japan First-class registered architect in Japan
-Career :
2010 the incentive award in the international public exhibition of The International Sumi-e Association (display in The National Art Center, Tokyo) in Japan
2011 the display in the international public exhibition of ‘Encre et papierid; versite’s asiatiques’ (at Espace des Blancs-Manteaux de la Mairie du 4e arrondissement) in Paris
2011 the prize in the international public exhibition of Salon des Artistes Francais (display in Grand Palais national museum) in Paris
2015 the Semi-grand Prize in the international public exhibition of The International Sumi-e Association (display in The National Art Center, Tokyo) in Japan
2016 the Cyuugokubijutuhousya Prize in the international public exhibition of The International Sumi-e Association (display in The National Art Center, Tokyo) in Japan

Dates of workshop: Sunday, 12th March 2017
Time: 13:00 – 17:00
Location: Japan Cultural Exchange (Above ’t Japanse Winkeltje)
Address: Nieuwezijds Voorburgwal 177-1, Amsterdam
Entrance of workshop: 78 euro (incl. BTW, material cost, renting tools)

Minimum number of participants: 6  
Maximum number of participants:  8

Cancellation fee after the payment
Within 1 week: 50% of the entrance fee
Within 3 days: 100% of the entrance fee

Jewellery making workshop with Kyoto material

jewelly as

Jewellery making workshop with Kyoto material

Original Jewellery Making Workshop with traditional Kyoto material!
MAKER KAMER’s next workshop will be the jewellery making on 11th Feb! Get creative with jewellery making with traditional kyoto materials!

The jewellery workshop given by two Amsterdam based Jewellery artist, Q Hisashi Shibata and Morgane de Klerk. They will introduce you to the joy of jewellery making by using beautiful Kyoto materials like silk ropes, fabric, and some unique motif made by designers. All materials you need and tools are provided for making your own creation! Afterwards you can bring home your own unique handmade necklace which will carry a special authentic Kyoto quality. You may want to create “the only one item” for Valentine’s Day. Don’t miss it!!
To sign up to the workshop, PLEASE send us an e-mail (ams@makerkamer.nl) in advance to reserve a seat!

Date: 11th February 2017
Time: 14:00 – 17:30
Duration: 3.5 hours
Participants fee p.p: 45 euro (incl. material costs)
Address: Nieuwezijds Voorburgwal 177-1, 1012 RK Amsterdam
Details: www.makerkamer.nl
Designer:
Q Hisashi Shibata (JP)
www.qhisashishibata.com, www.shinkaq.tumblr.com
Morgan de Klerk (FR/NL)
www.morganedeklerk.com,
www.zygomatique.bigcartel.com,
https://m.facebook.com/ZygomatiqueAccessories

Sumie workshop / January 2017 / Shrimp

Sumie workshop 2017

Theme of January: Shrimp

*This workshop is cancelled.

The subject of the January workshop is the shrimp. The method of painting you will practice for the shrimp uses Mokkotu-hō (without an outline). Sumi-e uses various techniques of gradation, bleeding, and blurring. Such techniques can be obtained through changing the amount of water added to the ink. You will deeply master the technique of gradation by getting a lot of practice in drawing a shrimp. When mastered, you will be able to make a fair depiction of a shrimp. Both a beginner artist and an experienced one can benefit from this workshop.

Sumie

Paintings in black ink are called sumie in Japan. Sumie basically uses only black ink but sometimes uses a little bit of other pigments as well. Sumie with other pigments is called Bokusaiga. Sumie uses various techniques of shading and gradation. Shading and gradation can be obtained through changing the amount of water added to the ink. Ink painting, which was developed as landscape paintings that is called Sansuiga in China in the last half of the Tang dynasty, became well-known as well as Zen in the Kamakura period (from 1185 to 1333), and then enjoyed great popularity in the Muromachi period (from 1333 to 1568). The subjects of Sumie include people, flowers, and birds as well.

Beauty of blank space

Sumie is that space is as important or perhaps more important than the objects. It is so-called “the beauty of blank space”. In Sumie, the white space or “emptiness” completes the painting.  On the other hand, to a westerner, empty space is often referred to as “negative” space. The pieces seem unfinished. This is one of the most different features between Sumie and the western methods.  Sumie is an art deeply rooted in Zen, it is one of the embodiments of Zen of finding beauty in blank space.

Workshop Leader

Teacher: Yuka
-Education : Tsukuba University in grad school (Master course) in Japan
-Licence : registered teacher in International Sumi-E Association in Japan First-class registered architect in Japan
-Career :
2010 the incentive award in the international public exhibition of The International Sumi-e Association (display in The National Art Center, Tokyo) in Japan
2011 the display in the international public exhibition of ‘Encre et papierid; versite’s asiatiques’ (at Espace des Blancs-Manteaux de la Mairie du 4e arrondissement) in Paris
2011 the prize in the international public exhibition of Salon des Artistes Francais (display in Grand Palais national museum) in Paris
2015 the Semi-grand Prize in the international public exhibition of The International Sumi-e Association (display in The National Art Center, Tokyo) in Japan
2016 the Cyuugokubijutuhousya Prize in the international public exhibition of The International Sumi-e Association (display in The National Art Center, Tokyo) in Japan

Date & time: Saturday, 14 January 2017, 14:00 – 16:30
Location: Japan Cultural Exchange (Above ’t Japanse Winkeltje)
Address: Nieuwezijds Voorburgwal 177-1, Amsterdam
Entrance: 55 euro (incl. BTW, material cost, renting tools)

Request & Sign up  : Applying workshop from HERE!

Minimum number of participants: 6  
Maximum number of participants:  8

Cancellation fee after the payment
Within 1 week: 50% of the entrance fee
Within 3 days: 100% of the entrance fee

Ink wash painting (Sumie) workshop – Landscape 3 –

3 workshops of landscape painting

The landscape workshops will be given in a total of three workshops in October, November and December 2016.

1. Rock and Mountain / 22nd October 2016
2. Tree and Water / 19th November 2016
3. Snow / 17th December 2016

These are the separate workshops of the series. You can participate in any as a one-off but you could also join all three, which will give you a strong base for painting landscapes. Beginners as well as advanced participants can join!

Ink wash painting is originally from China and it was introduced to Japan where it developed its own style. On the beautiful Washi (Japanese Traditional paper) you can paint the flowers or animals with the technique of shading and changing pressure within a single brushstroke. The Japanese workshop leader Mrs. Yuka Katamine, will teach us not only the technique but also the philosophical side, which relates to Zen. Let’s experience this together!

Sumie

Paintings in black ink are called sumie in Japan. Sumie basically uses only black ink but sometimes uses a little bit of other pigments as well. Sumie with other pigments is called Bokusaiga. Sumie uses various techniques of shading and gradation. Shading and gradation can be obtained through changing the amount of water added to the ink. Ink painting, which was developed as landscape paintings that is called Sansuiga in China in the last half of the Tang dynasty, became well-known as well as Zen in the Kamakura period (from 1185 to 1333), and then enjoyed great popularity in the Muromachi period (from 1333 to 1568). The subjects of Sumie include people, flowers, and birds as well.

Beauty of blank space

Sumie is that space is as important or perhaps more important than the objects. It is so-called “the beauty of blank space”. In Sumie, the white space or “emptiness” completes the painting.  On the other hand, to a westerner, empty space is often referred to as “negative” space. The pieces seem unfinished. This is one of the most different features between Sumie and the western methods.  Sumie is an art deeply rooted in Zen, it is one of the embodiments of Zen of finding beauty in blank space.

Landscape 3- Snow

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The last workshop in this landscape series is “Landscape – Snow”

The beginning of the workshop, it start with practising the basics of painting snowy mountains. After that, learning how to draw snow piled on roof tops and as a way to put it to practise, we will get the challenge to try our hand at painting the UNESCO heritage site Shirakawa-go village which is located in Gifu-prefecture.

Shirakawa-go with its collection of traditional Japanese houses with thatched rooftops, was registered as a UNESCO heritage site in 1995. These thatched rooftops are steep rooftops with an angle varying from 45 to 60 degrees, thatched with grass and it is one of Japan’s traditional architectural style.

Everyone will get to practise painting falling snow in this practical part. Everyone from beginners to experienced participants can join.

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Workshop Leader

Teacher: Yuka
-Education : Tsukuba University in grad school (Master course) in Japan
-Licence : registered teacher in International Sumi-E Association in Japan First-class registered architect in Japan
-Career :
2010 the incentive award in the international public exhibition of The International Sumi-e Association (display in The National Art Center, Tokyo) in Japan
2011 the display in the international public exhibition of ‘Encre et papierid; versite’s asiatiques’ (at Espace des Blancs-Manteaux de la Mairie du 4e arrondissement) in Paris
2011 the prize in the international public exhibition of Salon des Artistes Francais (display in Grand Palais national museum) in Paris
2015 the Semi-grand Prize in the international public exhibition of The International Sumi-e Association (display in The National Art Center, Tokyo) in Japan
2016 the Cyuugokubijutuhousya Prize in the international public exhibition of The International Sumi-e Association (display in The National Art Center, Tokyo) in Japan

Date & time: Saturday, 17 December 2016, 14:00 – 16:30
Location: Japan Cultural Exchange (Above ’t Japanse Winkeltje)
Address: Nieuwezijds Voorburgwal 177-1, Amsterdam
Entrance: 55 euro (incl. BTW, material cost, renting tools)

Request & Sign up  : Applying workshop from HERE!

Minimum number of participants: 6  
Maximum number of participants:  8

Cancellation fee after the payment
Within 1 week: 50% of the entrance fee
Within 3 days: 100% of the entrance fee

Ink wash painting (Sumie) workshop – Landscape 2 –

3 workshops of landscape painting

The workshops of Landscape will be held on three workshops in October, November and December 2016.

1. Rock and Mountain / 22nd October 2016
2. Tree and Water / 19th November 2016
3. Snow / 17th December 2016

These are the separate workshops as one-off. You can also take all 3 workshops, then you will get strong basis of painting the landscapes. These are for advanced participants and for beginners.

Ink wash painting is originally from China and it was introduced to Japan and developed their own style. On the beautiful Washi (Japanese Traditional paper) you can paint the flowers or animals with the technique of shading and pressure within a single brushstroke. By the Japanese workshop leader Mrs. Yuka Katamine, we can learn not only the technique but also the philosophical side, which relates to Zen. Let’s experience together!

Sumie

Paintings in black ink are called sumie in Japan. Sumie basically uses only black ink but sometimes uses a little bit of other pigments as well. Sumie with other pigments is called Bokusaiga. Sumie uses various techniques of shading and gradation. Shading and gradation can be obtained through changing the amount of water added to the ink. Ink painting, which was developed as landscape paintings that is called Sansuiga in China in the last half of the Tang dynasty, became well-known as well as Zen in the Kamakura period (from 1185 to 1333), and then enjoyed great popularity in the Muromachi period (from 1333 to 1568). The subjects of Sumie include people, flowers, and birds as well.

Beauty of blank space

Sumie is that space is as important or perhaps more important than the objects. It is so-called “the beauty of blank space”. In Sumie, the white space or “emptiness” completes the painting.  On the other hand, to a westerner, empty space is often referred to as “negative” space. The pieces seem unfinished. This point is one of the most different between Sumie and the western methods.  Sumie is an art deeply rooted in Zen, embodying many of the tenets of the Zen finding beauty in blank space.

Landscape 2-Water and Tree

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At first, after practicing the basic methods for drawing tree with outline and without outline, you will learn how to draw a tree for each season and such popular trees as a cedar tree, a pine tree and willow.

After then, you can learn how to draw water. At this time, I prepared the special rice paper for drawing water. This rice paper is covered with ‘dosa’. ‘Dosa’ is water repellent material mixed animal glue and alum. It would be easier to draw water without the trace of brush by using a rice paper with dosa.

sansui2_tree_w650

Workshop Leader

Teacher: Yuka
-Education : Tsukuba University in grad school (Master course) in Japan
-Licence : registered teacher in International Sumi-E Association in Japan First-class registered architect in Japan
-Career :
2010 the incentive award in the international public exhibition of The International Sumi-e Association (display in The National Art Center, Tokyo) in Japan

2011 the display in the international public exhibition of ‘Encre et papierid; versite’s asiatiques’ (at Espace des Blancs-Manteaux de la Mairie du 4e arrondissement) in Paris

2011 the prize in the international public exhibition of Salon des Artistes Francais (display in Grand Palais national museum) in Paris

2015 the Semi-grand Prize in the international public exhibition of The International Sumi-e Association (display in The National Art Center, Tokyo) in Japan

2016 the Cyuugokubijutuhousya Prize in the international public exhibition of The International Sumi-e Association (display in The National Art Center, Tokyo) in Japan

Date & time: Saturday, 19th November 2016, 14:00 – 16:30
Location: Japan Cultural Exchange (Above ’t Japanse Winkeltje)
Address: Nieuwezijds Voorburgwal 177-1, Amsterdam
Entrance: 55 euro (incl. BTW, material cost, renting tools)

Request & Sign up  : Applying workshop from HERE!

Minimum number of participants: 6  
Maximum number of participants:  8

Cancellation fee after the payment
Within 1 week: 50% of the entrance fee
Within 3 days: 100% of the entrance fee

Special pop up MAKER KAMER in Japan Museum SieboldHuis!

6 days special pop up lab & shop in Japan Museum SieboldHuis!

As the old capital where Japanese emperors resided for more than a thousand years, Kyoto is one of the ultimate cultural centers of Japan and still a home to many companies making diverse traditional products with amazing techniques. From 15 September 2016 to 31 March 2017, high quality products made by nine of such companies from Kyoto will be exhibited and sold at MAKER KAMER in Amsterdam.

Between 15th to 20th November, MAKER KAMER will come to Leiden to open 6 days special POP UP at Japan Museum SieboldHuis!

sieboldhuis_w650

On Sunday, 20th November, we have potters Mr. & Mrs. Wakunami from Soryugama who are coming from Japan to give a special demonstration and the workshop. We can experience the Kyoto’s ceramic making at the Japan Museum SieboldHuis!
The workshop will let you experience working with the potter’s wheel guided by the potters. After working with the wheel, you will get some nice Bancha (roasted tea) from Kyoto, served by MAKER KAMER’s special tea set.

MAKER KAMER is a place where the traditional products from Kyoto and Dutch creativity meet. Creators from Japan and Holland are encouraged to exchange their thoughts to learn from each other and be inspired. During the exhibition period, many workshops and events will be organized to create new opportunities for people, things, techniques and ideas to interact!

6 days pop up at Japan Museum SieboldHuis in Leiden

Period: 15th (Tue) – 20th (Sun) November, 2016
Opening time: 10 AM to 5 PM
Location: Japan Museum SieboldHuis (Rapenburg 19, Leiden)
Entrance of Japan Museum SieboldHuis : 8 euro for adults, Museumkaart is free
Website of Sieboldhuis

On 20th November: Special demonstration & pottery workshop from Kyoto!

Mr & Mrs Wakunami were born in families of potters. Since they were small, they used the wheel to make all kind of tableware. They will guide us how to work with the clay and the wheel, so it is a rare opportunity to experience Kyoto’s craftsman skill. The demonstration is open for everyone, but if you would like to join the workshop then please sign up in advance as the number of the participants is limited. After the workshop, the participants will be served a cup of Bancha tea from Kyoto with sweets.

Date: 20th November (Sun), 2016
Program:
1 – 3 PM: Demonstration of both potter’s wheel and slip cast technique
3 – 4 PM: Workshop of throwing on the potter’s wheel
Entrance of demonstration: Free
Participating workshop: 10 Euro p.p., including materials and tea from Kyoto with sweets
Maximum participants:  6 people
Sign up for workshop: send us e-mail to ams@makerkamer.nl

*You will not be making an actual ceramic object from the workshop, the workshop’s objective is to provide just the experience.

sieboldhuis

Sashiko workshop

Sashiko is an embroidery technique used to create abstract and geometric patterns (structure) on fabric. Sashiko started as a practical solution for mending and reinforcing fabrics to last longer and to make them warmer. The technique was applied in times when people had linen for their clothing and fabrics were precious. In the Meiji period (late 19th century), cotton got introduced and became popular among people. The smooth texture of cotton, compared to linen, enabled people to develop patterns which are recognized as Sashiko today.

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In the workshop, we will start with basic techniques of Sashiko by practicing some simple shapes.  Later we will move on trying traditional patterns.

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Workshop leader: Masaki Komoto

Date: 12th November (sat) 2016
Time: 13:00 -15:30

Location: ’t Japans Cultureel Centrum 2F (above Japan Cultural Exchange)
Address: Nieuwezijds Voorburgwal 177-2, Amsterdam
Workshop fee: 50 Euro (incl. BTW and material)
Minimum number of participants:  6 persons
Maximum number of participants: 8 persons

CLICK HERE TO APPLY!

Cancellation fee after the payment
Within 1 week: 50% of the entrance fee
Within 3 days: 100% of the entrance fee

4-day Kintsugi workshop using real Urushi lacquer

! Closed sign up already !

JCE introduced 4-days of traditional Kintsugi workshop this summer with the workshop leader Mrs. Mio Heki from Kyoto. We worked with natural materials, Urushi lacquer and pure gold powder. Mio is young female Urushi master, she organizes the workshops in Kyoto and working as the specialist of repairing the old statues from the temples. Because  we had such amazing teacher, last workshop gave us the new sights and understandings of the materials and traditions, techniques, etc… it was truly valuable!

Mio will be coming back again in this autumn, JCE is happy to announce that we can organize the workshop again!

The real Urushi needs a certain humidity to become dry and therefore the workshop will be for 4 days. The workshop price is therefore also higher than last time, but this is absolutely a rare opportunity to work with real materials and to learn from a real Urushi craftswoman. Please do not miss this amazing opportunity!
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Kintsugi and Maki-e  

Kintsugi is a process in which broken pottery is put back together using Japanese lacquer and Maki-e painting. Lacquer is a tree sap of the Urushi tree, which can be found all over Asia. In Japan, 5000-year-old lacquered baskets with Urushi have been excavated. Somewhat influenced by the Korean craft, the Japanese lacquer technique evolved on its own. By the Heian era (794–1185), the Maki-e painting, where Monyo design drawn with lacquer of Urushi is sprinkled with gold or silver dust, emerged as an art form. Kintsugi, which blossomed during the Muromachi period (1336–1573) due to the emergence of tea culture, wasn’t seen just as a way of fixing broken pottery, it was also seen as part of the Maki-e genre, and was admired as an artwork in itself. During the Age of Exploration, Westerners who came to Japan were drawn to Maki-e paintings, and commissioned many lacquer wares that they took back to Europe with them. The Urushi black background and beautiful gold lines were called ‘Japan’, and many lacquer wares were exported to the Netherlands.

Urushi 

Only 200 grams of lacquer can be squeezed out of a tree. The lacquer gatherers, who are called Kakiko’, tap the tree with a special knife and collect each drop during the summer months. The lacquerer called Nushi’ is put to rest in order to harden by a chemical process. It is kept in a special shelf called a Furo’ during a few days. The Furo’s temperature and humidity are kept stable (20℃ and 70%)

urushikin清水焼金継ぎ 朱

Workshop

We invite a real Urushi craftswoman, Mio Heki to teach us how to fix the potteries by Kintsugi in a traditional way. In Europe, you can buy a “Kintsugi kit”, but it will contain chemical glues. For this workshop, we will use real Urushi and gold, no glues, no chemicals. The process will take longer, but your potteries will be safe to use for eating and drinking. This is also a very rare opportunity to experience working with real materials and to experience the traditional process. Furthermore it is a rare chance to learn about Urushi, which is the traditional lacquer for Japanese crafts. The traditional technique of Kintsugi with Urushi involves a longer process. Putting the broken pieces together by Urushi, filling, grinding, painting, sprinkling, coating and polishing will normally take several months.

In this workshop, we’ll divide the whole process of traditional Kintsugi into 4 sessions. It takes time, but you will be able to work and learn with real materials (with real Ursuhi and gold powder). At the same time, you will learn about the traditional Japanese way of putting big value on and taking time to repair high quality products.

About the pieces of pottery to bring for repairing

We will repair the pottery with Urushi , rice powder , land powder, polishing powder and gold powder. Please refer to the following picture for what you can bring to the workshop. The cracks can be up to 5 mm and one broken pottery should consist of no more than two pieces (please don’t bring pottery that is broken into more than 2 pieces). Because the time is limited each participant can only repair two cracks and one pottery that is broken into 2 parts. Please bring 2 ceramic products and 2 boxes (to keep your pottery for the next session of the workshop).

欠け 辰砂 中皿裏 皿割れ 鍵

*Paint lacquer can cause to irritation to the skin.

*Please wear clothes you don’t mind getting dirty or bring an apron.

Mio Heki

The workshop leader, Ms. Mio Heki from Kyoto, studied Urushi at Kyoto University of art. She repairs temples, shrines, Buddha statues and tea utensils.

She leads the ‘URUSHI atelier Hifumi’ and organizes Kintsugi workshops and makes products for the Urushi jewelry studio in Kyoto.

Dates & Time: 

Day 1: Saturday 29 October: 10:00 – 13:00
Day 2: Sunday 13 November: 10:00 – 13:00
Day 3: Saturday 19 November: 10:00 – 13:00
Day 4: Sunday 20 November: 10:00 – 13:00

Participation fee:  350 euro (for 4 days *consecutive participation only! incl. VAT and the material cost)

Minimum participant: 4 persons
Maximum participants: 8 persons

Cancellation fee after the payment
Within 1 week: 50% of the participation cost
Within 3 days: 100% of the participation cost

Ink wash painting (Sumie) workshop – Landscape 1 –

3 workshops of landscape painting

The workshops of Landscape will be held on three workshops in October, November and December 2016.

1. Rock and Mountain / 22nd October 2016
2. Tree and Water / 19th November 2016
3. Snow / 17th December 2016

These are the separate workshops as one-off. You can also take all 3 workshops, then you will get strong basis of painting the landscapes. These are for advanced participants and for beginners.

Ink wash painting is originally from China and it was introduced to Japan and developed their own style. On the beautiful Washi (Japanese Traditional paper) you can paint the flowers or animals with the technique of shading and pressure within a single brushstroke. By the Japanese workshop leader Mrs. Yuka Katamine, we can learn not only the technique but also the philosophical side, which relates to Zen. Let’s experience together!

Sumie

Paintings in black ink are called sumie in Japan. Sumie basically uses only black ink but sometimes uses a little bit of other pigments as well. Sumie with other pigments is called Bokusaiga. Sumie uses various techniques of shading and gradation. Shading and gradation can be obtained through changing the amount of water added to the ink. Ink painting, which was developed as landscape paintings that is called Sansuiga in China in the last half of the Tang dynasty, became well-known as well as Zen in the Kamakura period (from 1185 to 1333), and then enjoyed great popularity in the Muromachi period (from 1333 to 1568). The subjects of Sumie include people, flowers, and birds as well.

Beauty of blank space

Sumie is that space is as important or perhaps more important than the objects. It is so-called “the beauty of blank space”. In Sumie, the white space or “emptiness” completes the painting.  On the other hand, to a westerner, empty space is often referred to as “negative” space. The pieces seem unfinished. This point is one of the most different between Sumie and the western methods.  Sumie is an art deeply rooted in Zen, embodying many of the tenets of the Zen finding beauty in blank space.

Landscape 1-Rock and mountain

sansuiga1_w650

We’ll first learn the basic techniques of making paintings of landscape and practice. There are techniques as Zōhō, Rohō, Sakafude-hō, Jyunpitu-hō, Kappitu-hō, Hahitu-hō, Tenpitu-hō, Hatuboku-hō, Haboku-hō, Sekiboku-hō. Those are the different ways of using brushes and strokes, we’ll go through everything and practice.

After that, we’ll paint the rocks. For painting the rock, you need to apply many techniques, as Fuheki-syun, Hima-syun, Untō-syun, Uten-syun, Kakyō-syun, Settai-syun, Gyūmō-syun, Beiten-syun. We’ll practice these techniques, and to paint the mountains with the combinations of these techniques we learn during the workshop. At the end of the workshop, you understand the basics and be able to paint the landscape with rocks and mountains.

sansuiga_w650

Workshop Leader

Teacher: Yuka
-Education : Tsukuba University in grad school (Master course) in Japan
-Licence : registered teacher in International Sumi-E Association in Japan First-class registered architect in Japan
-Career :
2010 the incentive award in the international public exhibition of The International Sumi-e Association (display in The National Art Center, Tokyo) in Japan

2011 the display in the international public exhibition of ‘Encre et papierid; versite’s asiatiques’ (at Espace des Blancs-Manteaux de la Mairie du 4e arrondissement) in Paris

2011 the prize in the international public exhibition of Salon des Artistes Francais (display in Grand Palais national museum) in Paris

2015 the Semi-grand Prize in the international public exhibition of The International Sumi-e Association (display in The National Art Center, Tokyo) in Japan

2016 the Cyuugokubijutuhousya Prize in the international public exhibition of The International Sumi-e Association (display in The National Art Center, Tokyo) in Japan

Date & time: Saturday, 12th October 2016, 14:00 – 16:30
Location: Japan Cultural Exchange (Above ’t Japanse Winkeltje)
Address: Nieuwezijds Voorburgwal 177-1, Amsterdam
Entrance: 55 euro (incl. BTW, material cost, renting tools)

Request & Sign up  : Applying workshop from HERE!

Minimum number of participants: 6  
Maximum number of participants:  8

Cancellation fee after the payment
Within 1 week: 50% of the entrance fee
Within 3 days: 100% of the entrance fee

Japanese paper (Washi) making workshop

 

 Washi – Japanese paper making –  workshop

The workshop on 1st October is already fully booked! Please join next time!

On 26th November 2014, UNESCO decided to add the traditional technique of crafting Japanese-style “Washi” paper to its list of intangible cultural heritage. Washi paper is commonly made using fibers from the bark of the Gampi Tree, the Mitsumata shrub (Edgeworthia chrysantha), or the Paper Mulberry, but also can be made using Bamboo, Hemp, Rice, and Wheat.

Washi is known worldwide for its beauty, strength, and durability. Therefore, it is used in many traditional arts, but it is also a popular material for contemporary artists.

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Dutch artist, Annelinde de Jong, studied Washi making in Kyoto under the traditional paper maker Shinji Hayashi, during the participation of “Kyoto Machiya AIR” in 2012. Mr. Hayashi taught her the whole process of papermaking: cleaning and cooking the fiber, preparing the pulp, and then scooping and drying the paper.

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After her studies in Kyoto, she continued making paper in the Netherlands, trying to experiment with different materials, and also producing other objects utilizing Washi papers. She’s currently trying to explore new ways of working with Washi paper whilst maintaining her artistic and contemporary style.

The workshop will start with a short introduction on traditional paper making and its history. Afterwards, we will create our own paper using various materials, combining Western and Eastern fibers and techniques. At the end of the workshop, you will have your own unique handmade paper to take home.

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It will take some time for the paper to dry, so it is not possible to take the papers home right away, but you can pick them up a few days later. It is also possible to have the papers sent by mail; this will involve some additional costs.

*All the tools and materials will be provided.

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Workshop leader: Annelinde de Jong

Born in the Netherlands, de Jong currently resides in Amsterdam. Working from simple subject matter and forms she is an expert in various forms of expression that include paintings, collages, and installation spaces where she pursues a minimalist world outlook. Annelinde de Jong has participated in various exhibitions and projects both in the Netherlands and abroad. In 2007 and 2009 she traveled to Hirado, Japan as part of the cultural exchange project ‘12xholland’. She has also taught painting and drawing at primary and secondary schools. In 2012 she returned to Japan, this time to study Washi – handmade Japanese paper. As part of Kyoto Machiya AIR she studied papermaking at the studio of Shinji Hayashi in Ayabe. Inspired by the traditional way of papermaking in Japan, she has continued making paper in her studio in Amsterdam, using and combining various fibers and techniques.

Date & time: 1st October (sat) 2016, 13:30 – 17:00
Locatie: ’t Japans Cultureel Centrum 2e verdieping (Nieuwezijds Voorburgwal 177-2, Amsterdam)
Entrance: 60 euro (incl. BTW, material cost, renting tools)

Request & Sign up  : Applying workshop from HERE!

Minimum number of participants: 6   Maximum number of participants:  8
Cancellation fee after the payment
Within 1 week: 50% of the entrance fee
Within 3 days: 100% of the entrance fee